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Books & Breakfast with Rachel Kushner

Books & Breakfast With Rachel Kushner

Literary Affairs is excited to welcome Rachel Kushner to discuss her book The Mars Room. Please join us for an exclusive Books & Breakfast event at the Hotel Bel Air on Tuesday, October 2nd, for an intimate conversation between Rachel Kushner and Julie Robinson.

The morning will include a continental breakfast, Q&A and book signing.

EVENT INFORMATION

Tuesday, October 2
10:30am – 12pm

Hotel Bel-Air
701 Stone Canyon Rd.
Beverly Hills, CA 90077

Tickets are $65 and can be purchased via the button below. No refunds.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Rachel Kushner’s new novel, The Mars Room, was published on May 1st, 2018. Kushner is also the author of The Flamethrowers, which was a finalist for the National Book Award and a New York Times Top Five Novel of 2013. Her debut novel, Telex from Cuba, was a finalist for the 2008 National Book Award and a New York Times bestseller and Notable Book. A collection of her early work, The Strange Case of Rachel K, was published by New Directions in 2015. Her fiction has appeared in the New Yorker, Harper’s, and the Paris Review. She is the recipient of a 2013 Guggenheim Fellowship and the 2016 Harold D. Vursell Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

ABOUT THE BOOK

From twice National Book Award–nominated Rachel Kushner, whose Flamethrowers was called “the best, most brazen, most interesting book of the year” (Kathryn Schulz, New York Magazine), comes a spectacularly compelling, heart-stopping novel about a life gone off the rails in contemporary America.

It’s 2003 and Romy Hall is at the start of two consecutive life sentences at Stanville Women’s Correctional Facility, deep in California’s Central Valley. Outside is the world from which she has been severed: the San Francisco of her youth and her young son, Jackson. Inside is a new reality: thousands of women hustling for the bare essentials needed to survive; the bluffing and pageantry and casual acts of violence by guards and prisoners alike; and the deadpan absurdities of institutional living, which Kushner evokes with great humor and precision.

Stunning and unsentimental, The Mars Room demonstrates new levels of mastery and depth in Kushner’s work. It is audacious and tragic, propulsive and yet beautifully refined. As James Wood said in The New Yorker, her fiction “succeeds because it is so full of vibrantly different stories and histories, all of them particular, all of them brilliantly alive.”