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Jill Lepore on The Twisted Life of “Frankenstein”

The Strange and Twisted Life of “Frankenstein”

After two hundred years, are we ready for the truth about Mary Shelley’s novel?

By 

Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin Shelley began writing “Frankenstein; or, the Modern Prometheus” when she was eighteen years old, two years after she’d become pregnant with her first child, a baby she did not name. “Nurse the baby, read,” she had written in her diary, day after day, until the eleventh day: “I awoke in the night to give it suck it appeared to be sleeping so quietly that I would not awake it,” and then, in the morning, “Find my baby dead.” With grief at that loss came a fear of “a fever from the milk.” Her breasts were swollen, inflamed, unsucked; her sleep, too, grew fevered. “Dream that my little baby came to life again; that it had only been cold, and that we rubbed it before the fire, and it lived,” she wrote in her diary. “Awake and find no baby.” Read more at The New Yorker.

The classic novel Frankenstein celebrates it’s 200th anniversary consider it as a book club selection maybe for October to celebrate Halloween?

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